Twitter Teachings for the Week

https://twitter.com/n_pinn/status/455441316499845121

This tweet contained a link to a video about using games to teach in a math classroom.  The teacher also gave some really good advice about being sure to challenge students so that they learn.  She said that she like the idea of using interactive games so that the students are challenged and learning “to roll with the punches” when things in the game aren’t going their way.  They have to use math skills but also use problem solving and strategizing skill while playing so that will help them develop more than one skill.  In order to play the game they have to be critically thinking about the math and through practical application of the math concept.  This game-based learning can be used in any classroom and for any subject.  It just takes some creativity to help your students learn and want to learn.

https://twitter.com/n_pinn/status/455443015025176576

This article from @edutopia offers good insight on how to deal with a situation that you do not want to escalate.  Some of the responses to a student expressing their frustration were really good things to say and things that I wouldn’t have thought of  While others seemed like they had a bit of potential to make the situation worse if the comment was taken in the wrong way.  One response suggested was to say “I’m to angry with you to respond right now.”  While I agree that it is important to stabilize a situation and then deal with it later I’m not sure I would want to tell a student I was angry with them.  In my opinion, that may destabilize the situation and could ruin part of your relationship with the student.  I think the most important part of the article was when it suggested making sure that you show the student that you are willing to hear their side of the story and work with them.  That’s something I definitely want to keep in mind whenever I am frustrated with a student’s behavior.

https://twitter.com/n_pinn/status/455449766399205376

This tweet links to an article about online learning at teaching.  While some of the content seems aimed at an entirely online course but any of the tips can be applied to teaching any part of a class online or doing online activities.  One aspect I think is really important is making sure you respond quickly.  With a lot of our classes we do a lot of online assignments and it really helps when a teacher tells you how quickly to expect a response.  I’ve also had classes where the teacher responds to posts about questions for tests very quickly during a set time before an exam and that has also been extremely helpful and makes me feel more comfortable in the class. It also like the suggestion that teachers reply informally and in a conversational way so it doesn’t feel too formal.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s